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Tennis is not just for pros.
Tennis is for everyone.

TennisTom.Net - Tennis for Everyone
TennisTom.Net

Tennis is not just for pros.
Tennis is for the Rest of Us.


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Tennis is not just for pros.
Tennis is for everyone.

WHAT TO DO IMMEDIATELY AFTER YOU HIT THE BALL

DURING A POINT

Basic Tennis by TennisTom 2010


AVOID The Post-Shot Lull. For many learning tennis players, what to do immediately after they hit the ball does not come intuitively. Many early learners seem to need to stop and see where their shot is going, and during critical seconds they are more or less stationary. They are often trying to resolve a number of questions concerning their shot and due to inexperience they fall into the post-shot lull.

No matter what your opponents’ skill level, you should adjust your position on the court immediately after hitting the ball. Of course, this presents the dilemma: Move to where?


THE ANSWER TO WHERE YOU SHOULD MOVE TO.

Move your body to just behind the most likely area to which your opponent might return your shot. An explanation of that area is covered in the instructional “Angle of Possible Good Shots & Percentage Tennis.” I suggest reading this instructional as soon as you finish this one, so you won’t be left in tennis limbo. As you may know, tennis limbo is an unsavory place to be.


4 modes of movement: Momentarily Immobile, Defensive, Proactive, or Aggressive.

  • If you choose to be momentarily immobile out of default, you will not be where you need to be for the next shot unless the ball is accidentally hit right back to you.


  • If you choose to be defensive, then you will move to a spot considerably behind the most likely area that your opponent may return the ball. This is the best choice for beginners.


  • If you choose to be proactive, then you will move to an area that is just behind where a return might likely be. This is the best choice for learners as their abilities progress as well as for more advanced players.


  • If you choose to be aggressive then that’s another scenario, and we are not concerned with aggressive play at the moment. Why? Because all beginners. early learners, and novices’ skill levels have not progressed that far yet. If you are athletic, consider the phenomenon that it is entirely possible to be too aggressive, which means playing too far beyond your capabilities to be effective.


Importantly, as soon as you hit the ball and start to move, grab your racket shaft with your non-dominant hand, which allows you to prepare early for hitting your next shot. It only takes a millisecond and doesn’t cost you any delay time.


As soon as you hit the ball you should move immediately to a spot which will allow you to play the opponentslikely return. Many learners develop a habit of lingering in no man’s land, several feet inside their baseline, which often results in having to play balls defensively and increases their likelihood of missing a shot. Moving early to the area of possible good shots is absolutely indispensable for playing good tennis.


[Companion reference: Angle of Possible Good Shots & Percentage Tennis]


[8B1-What to Do Immediately After You Hit the Ball During a Point] [Rev 4-30-11]

 

 
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